6 Tips for Having Serious Conversations with Your Boss

October 10th, 2017

You’re thinking of leaving. You want to respond to criticism you think is unfair. Or you’re interested in getting promoted – and getting a raise. Whatever the case for you, as leading Houston recruiters, Murray Resources knows these kinds of conversations are often awkward for employees. How can you approach them and get the results you want?

#1. Be prepared.

Before you walk into your boss’s office, be prepared for the conversation. For instance, if you’re asking for a raise, make sure you have hard facts and numbers to back up why you deserve a bump in salary. If, however, you think you’ve been criticized unfairly by your boss, be prepared with evidence that proves your point.

#2. Structure the conversation.

When it comes to difficult conversations, don’t wing it. It’s easier if you think through how the meeting should flow and also write down key points you want to get across. That way, you’ll be more effective and thorough when you’re communicating.

#3. Stay calm.

As Houston recruiters, Murray Resources knows if you’re upset or nervous about the conversation, it’s easy to get flustered and lose your confidence. Likewise, if you’re angry about a situation at work, you might be tempted to barge into your boss’s office and confront them. But this isn’t effective. Even if your boss was in the wrong, you need to approach the conversation in a way that’s both calm and diplomatic.

#4. Maintain eye contact and sit up straight.

Don’t let your body language give you away. Instead, it’s important to appear confident, maintaining eye contact and sitting straight. When you do, your boss will have more confidence in what you’re saying.

#5. Be honest.

Don’t exaggerate or make things up to get your point across. Instead, simply be factual and honest when talking to your boss.

#6. Don’t let them blow you off.

If you have something important to say to your boss, you’re probably desperate to get it out and put it behind you. But boss’s are busy and the chance of a reschedule are high. While if this happens one time, it’s not a big deal, do insist on a meeting if it keeps happening. Your boss owes it to you to hear you out.

When it comes to having a difficult conversation, focus on preparing, staying calm and being upfront. Your boss might not agree with you, but they’ll respect you for it.

Interested in advancing your career with a new position?

Call the experts at Murray Resources. As leading Houston recruiters, we can give you the inside scoop on getting hired at some of the city’s top employers. Contact us today to learn more – or get started.

Leave a Reply

You must be logged in to post a comment.

Hire Now!