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Applying for a New Job? Don’t Let These Resume Spelling & Grammar Mistakes Sabotage You

April 3rd, 2018

As one of Houston’s top employment agencies, Murray Resources knows that your resume is the first impression a hiring manager will have of you. Submit a polished and professional one, and you’ll increase your odds of getting a call for an interview. If, however, your resume is full of spelling and grammar mistakes, you’ll likely get pushed out of the running, even if you have the right experience.

To help ensure that doesn’t happen to you, here’s a look at a few common mistakes candidates make when it comes to spelling and grammar, and how to avoid them:

The wrong word choice.

Called homophones, these words – like “to”, “two” and “too”, and “there,” “they’re” and “their” – sound the same but completely change the meaning of what you’re trying to say. What makes it even harder is that most auto spelling and grammar checks in software programs can miss these words. That’s why it’s so important to carefully proofread your resume multiple time before sending it in to a potential employer.

Some other homophones to be careful of on your resume include:

  • Affected / effected
  • Insure / ensure
  • Than / then
  • Are / our
  • You’re / your

Misusing apostrophes.

The apostrophe is one of the most misused punctuation marks in the English language, with many job seekers mistakenly using the mark whenever they make a word plural. But apostrophes are only for indicating possession or creating a conjunction. For instance, consider the following usage:

Correct: “Authored business plan and initiated company’s new product line.”
Incorrect: “Managed 10 employee’s.”

Using only the past tense.

As one of Houston’s top employment agencies, Murray Resources knows that tense is another important consideration when it comes to proper grammar on your resume. When you’re talking about past positions you held, then the past tense (“worked,” “spearheaded,” etc.) is the correct tense to use. However, when discussing the current job you hold, switch to present tense to indicate that you’re still employed. Using only the past tense to describe your background will leave hiring managers confused.

Typos.

Sending in a resume with a small typo on it isn’t going to be the end of the world. But if there are several, then it’s going to reflect poorly on you. Instead, invest the time to carefully spell check your resume; even better, ask a trusted family member or friend to do the same. That way, you can cut town considerably on the risk of submitting a resume with embarrassing typos and spelling errors.

Need more help creating a resume that gets results or with your job search in general?

Call the experts at Murray Resources. As one of Houston’s top employment agencies, we can help you craft a polished resume, prepare for interviews and connect you with leading jobs often not advertised – all so you can secure the opportunity you want. Contact us today to learn more or get started.

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